Fairy tales weren't always written for kids. The older versions of the most famous tales were addressed to adults. Thus they were darker and more sinister. We're here to explore their dark side...

The Dark Side of the Grimm Fairy Tales

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm’s collection of folktales contains some of the best-known children’s characters in literary history, from Snow White and Rapunzel to Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood. Yet the brothers originally filled their book, which became known as “Grimm’s Fairy Tales,” with gruesome scenes that wouldn’t be out of place in an R-rated movie. The Grimms never even set out to entertain kids. The first edition of “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” was scholarly in tone, with many footnotes and no illustrations. Only later, as children became their main audience, did they take out some of the more adult content. Their stories were then further sanitized as they were adapted by Walt Disney and others. As the 150th anniversary of Jacob’s death was last month—he passed away on September 20, 1863, about four years after Wilhelm—check out some of the surprisingly dark themes that appear in the Grimms’ work.

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The Brothers Grimm Little Red Riding Hood Illustrated by Daniel Egnéus 

I think all of us know the story. The Grimm version introduced the huntsman as Little Red’s rescuer after the wolf eats her and her granny and everyone lives happy ever after.
Much earlier versions also liked to spice up the sexuality angle of the story, by having her outwit the wolf by performing a striptease for him while he’s lying in bed dressed as her Grandmother, and then running away while he’s “distracted”

Wait, it gets worse. This is the most horrifying bit that got filtered out before the tale reached both the Grimm’s and Perrault (and in fact, only made it into a few written texts). In this version, the Wolf dissects Grandmother, then invites Red in for a meal of her flesh, presumably with a side of fava beans and a nice Chianti. Then he eats her, too. [x]

The Brothers Grimm Little Red Riding Hood Illustrated by Daniel Egnéus

I think all of us know the story. The Grimm version introduced the huntsman as Little Red’s rescuer after the wolf eats her and her granny and everyone lives happy ever after.

Much earlier versions also liked to spice up the sexuality angle of the story, by having her outwit the wolf by performing a striptease for him while he’s lying in bed dressed as her Grandmother, and then running away while he’s “distracted”

Wait, it gets worse. This is the most horrifying bit that got filtered out before the tale reached both the Grimm’s and Perrault (and in fact, only made it into a few written texts). In this version, the Wolf dissects Grandmother, then invites Red in for a meal of her flesh, presumably with a side of fava beans and a nice Chianti. Then he eats her, too. [x]

Wednesday, 31 July 2013

The girl & the Siren from Jakob Arevärn on Vimeo.

The girl & the Siren

Directed and animated by: Jacob Petersson & Cristoffer Ålund
Setdesign: Jacob Petersson & Cristoffer Ålund
Produced by: Jakob Arevarn
Sound design and score: A2

Runningtime: 17 min
Shot with Canon 450d
For more info visit the official fbpage:
facebook.com/pages/Flickan-Sirenen/140845226022738?sk=wall

Friday, 8 March 2013

Sun, Moon, and Talia

Sun, Moon, and Talia (Sole, Luna, e Talia) is an Italian literary fairy tale written by Giambattista Basile in his 1634 work, the Pentamerone. Charles Perrault retold this fairy tale in 1697 as The Sleeping Beauty.

As one of the earliest Sleeping Beauty tales published in Europe, Basile’s Sun, Moon, and Talia contains dark elements of rape, cannibalism and murder.

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Thursday, 7 February 2013
en-vele-andere:

beauty and the beast (reprint from la plume 1902) antonio de la gándara (1861–1917)

en-vele-andere:

beauty and the beast (reprint from la plume 1902)
antonio de la gándara (1861–1917)

Tuesday, 15 January 2013
Illustrator Yana Moskaluk has completed some dark, mysterious yet astoundingly beautiful illustrations for her Russian Fairy Tale collection. Located in Moscow, Russia, the illustrator makes us believe that fairy tales can elicit all sorts of different moods. Love the exact precision of lines in each drawing, the selective coloring and the use of patterns in her illustrations. [x]

Illustrator Yana Moskaluk has completed some dark, mysterious yet astoundingly beautiful illustrations for her Russian Fairy Tale collection. Located in Moscow, Russia, the illustrator makes us believe that fairy tales can elicit all sorts of different moods. Love the exact precision of lines in each drawing, the selective coloring and the use of patterns in her illustrations. [x]

Saturday, 12 January 2013
Kay Rasmus Nielsen 'At Rest in the Dark Wood'
East of the Sun and West of the Moon: Old Tales from the North 
a collection of Scandinavian fairy tales, illustrated by the Danish artist Kay Rasmus Nielsen

Kay Rasmus Nielsen 'At Rest in the Dark Wood'

East of the Sun and West of the Moon: Old Tales from the North 

a collection of Scandinavian fairy tales, illustrated by the Danish artist Kay Rasmus Nielsen

Sunday, 23 December 2012

The Three Snake-Leaves

image

Image by  by ~KDodge

The Three Snake-Leaves
Grimms Fairy Tales and German Folklore

There was once on a time a poor man, who could no longer support his only son. Then said the son, “Dear father, things go so badly with us that I am a burden to you. I would rather go away and see how I can earn my bread.” So the father gave him his blessing, and with great sorrow took leave of him. At this time the King of a mighty empire was at war, and the youth took service with him, and with him went out to fight. And when he came before the enemy, there was a battle, and great danger, and it rained shot until his comrades fell on all sides, and when the leader also was killed, those left were about to take flight, but the youth stepped forth, spoke boldly to them, and cried, “We will not let our fatherland be ruined!” Then the others followed him, and he pressed on and conquered the enemy. When the King heard that he owed the victory to him alone, he raised him above all the others, gave him great treasures, and made him the first in the kingdom.

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Thursday, 20 December 2012